San Francisco

We’ve compiled the best of the best in San Francisco - browse our top choices for the top things to see or do during your stay.

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  • 1. Alamo Square Park

    Western Addition | City Park

    Whether you've seen them on postcards or on the old TV show Full House, the colorful "Painted Ladies" Victorian houses are some of San Francisco...

    Whether you've seen them on postcards or on the old TV show Full House, the colorful "Painted Ladies" Victorian houses are some of San Francisco's world-renowned icons. The signature view of these beauties with the downtown skyline in the background is from the east side of this hilly park. Tourists love the photo opportunities, but locals also adore the park's tennis courts, dog runs, and ample picnic area—with great views, of course. After taking plenty of photos, swing by the park's northwest corner and admire the William Westerfeld House (1198 Fulton St.), a splendid five-story late-19th-century Victorian mansion. If it's a sunny day, grab picnic provisions from Bi-Rite Market (550 Divisadero St., at Hayes St.). On Fridays and weekends, the Lady Falcon Coffee Club truck is stationed in the park, offering a great caffeine pick-me-up.

    San Francisco, California, 94117, USA
  • 2. Alcatraz

    Embarcadero | Jail/Prison

    Thousands of visitors come every day to walk in the footsteps of Alcatraz's notorious criminals. The stories of life and death on "the Rock...

    Thousands of visitors come every day to walk in the footsteps of Alcatraz's notorious criminals. The stories of life and death on "the Rock" may sometimes be exaggerated, but it's almost impossible to resist the chance to wander the cell block that tamed the country's toughest gangsters and saw daring escape attempts of tremendous desperation. Fewer than 2,000 inmates ever did time on the Rock, and though they weren't the worst criminals, they were definitely the worst prisoners, including Al "Scarface" Capone, Robert "The Birdman" Stroud, and George "Machine Gun Kelly." Some tips for escaping to Alcatraz: (1) Buy your ticket in advance. Visit the website for Alcatraz Cruises (www.alcatrazcruises.com) to scout out available departure times for the ferry. (2) Dress smart. Bring a jacket to ward off the chill from the boat ride and wear comfortable shoes. (3) Go for the evening tour. The evening tour has programs not offered during the day, the bridge-to-bridge view of the city twinkles at night, and your "prison experience" will be amplified as darkness falls. (4) Be mindful of scheduled and limited-capacity talks. The boat ride to the island is brief (15 minutes) but affords beautiful views of the city, Marin County, and the East Bay. The audio tour, highly recommended, includes observations by guards and prisoners about life in one of America's most notorious penal colonies. Plan your schedule to allow at least three hours for the visit and boat rides combined.

    Pier 33, San Francisco, California, 94133, USA
    415-981–7625

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: From $41
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  • 3. Alta Plaza Park

    Pacific Heights | City Park

    Golden Gate Park's longtime superintendent, John McLaren, designed the nearly 12-acre park in the early 1900s, modeling its steep south-facing...

    Golden Gate Park's longtime superintendent, John McLaren, designed the nearly 12-acre park in the early 1900s, modeling its steep south-facing terracing on that of the Grand Casino in Monte Carlo, Monaco. At any time of day, you're guaranteed to find San Francisco's exercise warriors running up the park's south steps like Rocky Balboa in the famous Rocky movies. From the top of those steps, you can see Marin to the north, downtown to the east, Twin Peaks to the south, and Golden Gate Park to the west. Kids love the many play structures at the large, enclosed playground at the top; dogs love the off-leash area in the park's southeast corner.

    Bordered by Clay, Steiner, Jackson, and Scott Sts., San Francisco, California, 94115, USA
  • 4. Asian Art Museum

    Civic Center | Museum/Gallery

    You don't have to be a connoisseur of Asian art to appreciate a visit to this museum whose monumental exterior conceals a light, open, and welcoming...

    You don't have to be a connoisseur of Asian art to appreciate a visit to this museum whose monumental exterior conceals a light, open, and welcoming space. The fraction of the Asian's collection on display (about 2,500 pieces out of 15,000-plus total) is laid out thematically and by region, making it easy to follow historical developments.Begin on the third floor, where highlights of Buddhist art in Southeast Asia and early China include a large, jewel-encrusted, exquisitely painted 19th-century Burmese Buddha, and clothed rod puppets from Java. On the second floor you can find later Chinese works, as well as pieces from Korea and Japan. The joy here is all in the details: on a whimsical Korean jar, look for a cobalt tiger jauntily smoking a pipe, or admire the delicacy of the Japanese tea implements. The ground floor is devoted to temporary exhibits and the museum's wonderful gift shop. During spring and summer, visit the museum the first Thursday evening of the month for extended programs and sip drinks while a DJ spins tunes.

    200 Larkin St., between McAllister and Fulton Sts., San Francisco, California, 94102, USA
    415-581–3500

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $20 weekdays, $25 weekends, free 1st Sun. of month; $10 Thurs. 5–9, Closed Mon.
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  • 5. Baker Beach

    Presidio | Beach

    West of the Golden Gate Bridge is a mile-long stretch of soft sand beneath steep cliffs, beloved for its spectacular views and laid-back vibe...

    West of the Golden Gate Bridge is a mile-long stretch of soft sand beneath steep cliffs, beloved for its spectacular views and laid-back vibe (read: good chance you'll see naked people here on the northernmost end). Its isolated location makes it rarely crowded, but many San Franciscans know that there is no better place to take in the sunset than this beach. Kids love climbing around the old Battery Chamberlin. This is truly one of those places that inspires local pride. Amenities: parking (free); toilets. Best for: nudists; solitude; sunsets.

    Baker Beach, San Francisco, California, USA

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free
  • 6. Buchanan Mall

    Japantown | Store/Mall

    The shops lining this open-air mall are geared more toward locals—travel agencies, electronics shops—but there are some fun Japanese-goods stores...

    The shops lining this open-air mall are geared more toward locals—travel agencies, electronics shops—but there are some fun Japanese-goods stores here, too. Start your exploration with fabulous mochi (a soft, sweet Japanese rice confection) at Benkyodo Company ( 1747 Buchanan St. 415/922–1244www.benkyodocompany.com ), a local legend that has been in business since 1906 and still feels like a time warp. It's easy to spend hours among the fabulous origami and craft papers at Paper Tree ( 1743 Buchanan St. 415/921–7100paper-tree.com). After shop browsing, have a seat on the steps around local artist Ruth Asawa's twin origami-style fountains, which sit in the middle of the mall. Wrap up a visit with lunch at Hinodeya Ramen ( 1737 Buchanan St.415/757–0552hinodeyaramen.com), serving lighter dashi (clear-broth) ramen, a rarity in the city.

    Buchanan St. between Post and Sutter Sts., San Francisco, California, 94115, USA
  • 7. California Academy of Sciences

    Golden Gate Park | Museum/Gallery

    With its native plant–covered living roof, retractable ceiling, three-story rain forest, gigantic planetarium, living coral reef, and frolicking...

    With its native plant–covered living roof, retractable ceiling, three-story rain forest, gigantic planetarium, living coral reef, and frolicking penguins, the California Academy of Sciences is one of the city's most spectacular treasures. Dramatically designed by Renzo Piano, it's an eco-friendly, energy-efficient adventure in biodiversity and green architecture. Moving away from a restrictive role as a museum that cataloged natural history, the academy these days is all about sustainability and the future, but the locally beloved dioramas in African Hall remain.It's best to look at the academy's floor plan to design your visit before you arrive. Here's the quick version: head left from the entrance to the wooden walkway over otherworldly rays in the Philippine Coral Reef, then continue to the Swamp to see Claude, the famous albino alligator. Swing through African Hall and study the penguins, take the elevator up to the living roof, then return to the main floor and get in line to explore the Rainforests of the World. You'll end up below ground in the Amazonian Flooded Rainforest, where you can explore the academy's other aquarium exhibits. The popular adults-only NightLife event, held every Thursday evening, includes after-dark access to all exhibits, as well as special programming and a full bar. Considering the hefty price of admission, start early and take advantage of in-and-out privileges to take a break.

    55 Music Concourse Dr., San Francisco, California, 94118, USA
    415-379–8000

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: From $30; free one Sun. per quarter; save $3 if you bike, walk, or take public transit here
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  • 8. Castro Theatre

    Castro | Arts/Performance Venue

    Here's a classic way to join in a beloved Castro tradition: grab some popcorn and catch a flick at this 1,500-seat art-deco theater built in...

    Here's a classic way to join in a beloved Castro tradition: grab some popcorn and catch a flick at this 1,500-seat art-deco theater built in 1922, the grandest of San Francisco's few remaining movie palaces. The neon marquee, which stands at the top of the Castro strip, is the neighborhood's great landmark. The Castro was the fitting host of 2008's red-carpet preview of Gus Van Sant's film Milk, starring Sean Penn as openly gay San Francisco supervisor Harvey Milk. The theater's elaborate Spanish baroque interior is fairly well preserved. Before many shows, the theater's pipe organ rises from the orchestra pit and an organist plays pop and movie tunes, usually ending with the Jeanette MacDonald standard "San Francisco" (go ahead, sing along). The crowd can be enthusiastic and vocal, talking back to the screen as loudly as it talks to them. Flicks such as Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? take on a whole new life, with the assembled beating the actors to the punch and fashioning even snappier comebacks for Elizabeth Taylor. There are often family-friendly sing-alongs to classics like Mary Poppins, as well as the occasional niche film festival.

    429 Castro St., San Francisco, California, 94114, USA
    415-621–6120

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $14
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  • 9. Chase Center

    Sports Venue

    The National Basketball Association's Golden State Warriors moved across the bay from Oakland to this spectacular arena in 2019. They are the...

    The National Basketball Association's Golden State Warriors moved across the bay from Oakland to this spectacular arena in 2019. They are the headliners of the city's marquee indoor entertainment complex, which opened with a concert by Metallica with the San Francisco Symphony, followed by global-superstar performances by the likes of Sir Elton John and Janet Jackson. While the action really happens inside, don't miss a walk around the beautiful bayfront grounds; a highlight is Olafur Eliasson's stunning, must-photograph Seeing Spheres installation.

    1 Warriors Way, Mission Bay, San Francisco, California, 94158, USA
    415-479–4667
  • 10. City Hall

    Civic Center | Government Building

    This imposing 1915 structure with its massive gold-leaf dome—higher than the U.S. Capitol's—is about as close to a palace as you're going to...

    This imposing 1915 structure with its massive gold-leaf dome—higher than the U.S. Capitol's—is about as close to a palace as you're going to get in San Francisco: the classic granite-and-marble behemoth was modeled after St. Peter's Basilica in Rome. Architect Arthur Brown Jr., who was also behind Coit Tower and the War Memorial Opera House, designed an interior with grand columns and a sweeping central staircase. The 1899 structure it replaced had taken 27 years to erect, but it collapsed in about 27 seconds during the 1906 earthquake. City Hall was seismically retrofitted in the late 1990s, but the sense of history remains palpable, and you can learn about it on a tour. Some noteworthy events that have taken place here include the hosing of civil-rights and freedom-of-speech protesters (1960); the assassinations of Mayor George Moscone and openly gay supervisor Harvey Milk (1978); the torching of the lobby by angry members of the gay community in response to the light sentence given to the former supervisor who killed both men (1979); and the first domestic partnership registrations of gay couples (1991). In 2004, Mayor Gavin Newsom took a stand against then-current state and federal law by issuing marriage licenses to same-sex partners. Across Polk Street from City Hall is Civic Center Plaza, with lawns, walkways, seasonal flower beds, a playground, and an underground parking garage. This sprawling space is generally clean but somewhat grim, as many homeless people hang out here.

    1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Pl. , bordered by Van Ness Ave. and Polk, Grove, and McAllister Sts., San Francisco, California, 94102, USA
    415-554–6023-recorded tour info

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free, Closed weekends
  • 11. City Lights Bookstore

    North Beach | Store/Mall

    The exterior of this famous literary bookstore is iconic in itself, from the replica of a revolutionary mural destroyed in Chiapas, Mexico,...

    The exterior of this famous literary bookstore is iconic in itself, from the replica of a revolutionary mural destroyed in Chiapas, Mexico, by military forces to the art banners hanging above the windows. Designated a landmark by the city, the hangout of Beat-era writers and independent publishers remains a vital part of San Francisco's literary scene. Browse the three levels of poetry, philosophy, politics, fiction, history, and local zines, to the beat of creaking wood floors. Back in the day, writers like Allen Ginsberg and Jack Kerouac would do their reading here (and even receive mail in the basement). The late poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti, who cofounded City Lights in 1953, cemented its place in history by publishing Ginsberg's Howl and Other Poems in 1956. The small volume was ignored in the mainstream . . . until Ferlinghetti and the bookstore manager were arrested for obscenity and corruption of youth. In the landmark First Amendment trial that followed, the judge exonerated both men. Howl went on to become a classic.Stroll Kerouac Alley, branching off Columbus Avenue next to City Lights, to read the quotes from Ferlinghetti, Maya Angelou, Confucius, John Steinbeck, and the street's namesake embedded in the pavement.

    261 Columbus Ave., San Francisco, California, 94133, USA
    415-362–8193
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  • 12. Dolores Park

    Mission District | City Park

    A two-square-block microcosm of life in the district, Mission Dolores Park is one of San Francisco's liveliest green spaces: dog lovers and...

    A two-square-block microcosm of life in the district, Mission Dolores Park is one of San Francisco's liveliest green spaces: dog lovers and their pampered pups congregate, kids play at the extravagant playground, and hipsters hold court, drinking beer and rosé cans on sunny days. (Fair warning: if it's over 70°, the place can get packed like traffic at rush hour for picnic-blanket space.) During the summer, Dolores Park hosts movie nights, performances by the San Francisco Mime Troupe, and any number of pop-up events and impromptu parties. Spend a warm day here—maybe sitting at the top of the park with a view of the city and the Bay Bridge —surrounded by locals and that laid-back, still-abundant San Francisco energy, and you may well find yourself plotting your move to the city. The best views are in the southeast corner, near the historic golden fire hydrant that saved the neighborhood after the 1906 earthquake.

    Between 18th and 20th Sts. and Dolores and Church Sts., San Francisco, California, USA
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  • 13. Exploratorium

    Embarcadero | Museum/Gallery

    Walking into this fascinating "museum of science, art, and human perception" is like visiting a mad-scientist's laboratory, but one in which...

    Walking into this fascinating "museum of science, art, and human perception" is like visiting a mad-scientist's laboratory, but one in which most of the exhibits are supersize and you can play with everything. Signature experiential exhibits include the Tinkering Studio and a glass Bay Observatory building, where the exhibits inside help visitors better understand what they see outside. Get an Alice-in-Wonderland feeling in the Distorted Room, where you seem to shrink and grow as you walk across the slanted, checkered floor. In the Shadow Box, a powerful flash freezes an image of your shadow on the wall; jumping is a favorite pose. More than 650 other exhibits focus on sea and insect life, computers, electricity, patterns and light, language, the weather, and more. One surefire hit is the pitch-black, hands-on Tactile Dome ($15 extra; reservations required): crawl through ladders, slides, and tunnels, relying solely on your sense of touch. Don't miss a walk around the outside of the museum afterward for superb views and a lesson about the bay's sediment and water motion in the Bay Windows presentation.

    Piers 15–17, San Francisco, California, 94111, USA
    415-561–0360-general information

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $30
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  • 14. Ferry Building

    Embarcadero | Market/Bazaar

    The jewel of the Embarcadero, erected in 1896 and now home to an outstanding food marketplace, is topped by a 230-foot clock tower modeled after...

    The jewel of the Embarcadero, erected in 1896 and now home to an outstanding food marketplace, is topped by a 230-foot clock tower modeled after the campanile of the cathedral in Seville, Spain. On the morning of April 18, 1906, the tower's four clock faces stopped at 5:17—the moment the great earthquake struck—and stayed still for 12 months.Today San Franciscans flock to the street-level marketplace, stocking up on supplies from local favorites, such as Acme Bread, Blue Bottle Coffee, El Porteño (empanadas), the gluten-free Mariposa Baking Company, and Humphry Slocombe (ice cream). The Slanted Door, the city's beloved high-end Vietnamese restaurant, is the fine dining favorite here, along with Hog Island Oyster Company and the seasonal Californian duo of Bouli Bar and Boulette's Larder. On the plaza side, the outdoor tables at Gott's Roadside offer great people-watching and famous burgers. On Saturday morning the plazas outside the building buzz with an upscale farmers' market. Extending south from the piers north of the building to the Bay Bridge, the waterfront promenade out front is a favorite among joggers and picnickers, with a view of sailboats plying the bay. True to its name, the Ferry Building still serves actual ferries: from its eastern flank they sail to Sausalito, Larkspur, Tiburon, and the East Bay.

    Embarcadero , 1 Ferry Bldg., at foot of Market St., San Francisco, California, 94111, USA
    415-983–8030
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  • 15. Golden Gate Bridge

    Presidio | Bridge/Tunnel

    Instantly recognizable as an icon of San Francisco, the two reddish-orange towers of the majestic Golden Gate Bridge rise 750 feet over the...

    Instantly recognizable as an icon of San Francisco, the two reddish-orange towers of the majestic Golden Gate Bridge rise 750 feet over the Golden Gate strait at the mouth of San Francisco Bay, linking the city and Marin County. With its simple but powerful art-deco design, the 1.7-mile suspension span was built to withstand winds of more than 100 mph. It's also not a bad place to be in an earthquake: designed to sway almost 28 feet, the Golden Gate Bridge (unlike the Bay Bridge) was undamaged by the 1989 Loma Prieta quake. If you're walking on the bridge when it's windy, stand still and you can feel it swaying a bit. Crossing the Golden Gate Bridge under your own power is exhilarating—a little scary, and definitely chilly. From the bridge's eastern-side walkway, the only side pedestrians are allowed on, you can take in the San Francisco skyline and the bay islands; look west for the wild hills of the Marin Headlands, the curving coast south to Lands End, and the Pacific Ocean. On sunny days, sailboats dot the water, and brave windsurfers test the often-treacherous tides beneath the bridge. A vista point on the Marin County side provides a spectacular city panorama. A structural engineer, dreamer, and poet named Joseph Strauss worked tirelessly for 20 years to make the bridge a reality, first promoting the idea of it and then overseeing design and construction. Though the final structure bore little resemblance to his original plan, Strauss guarded his legacy jealously, refusing to recognize the seminal contributions of engineer Charles Ellis. In 2007, the Golden Gate Bridge district finally recognized Ellis's role, though Strauss, who died less than a year after the bridge's opening day in 1937, would doubtless be pleased with the inscription on his statue, which stands sentry in the southern parking lot: "The Man Who Built the Bridge." At the outdoor exhibits near the bridge's Welcome Center, you can see the bridge rise before your eyes on hologram panels, learn about the features that make it art deco, and read about the personalities behind its design and construction. City Guides (sfcityguides.org) offers free walking tours of the bridge every Sunday at 11 am.

    Lincoln Blvd., near Doyle Dr. and Fort Point, San Francisco, California, 94129, USA
    415-921–5858

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free
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  • 16. Grace Cathedral

    Nob Hill | Religious Building/Site/Shrine

    Not many churches can boast an altarpiece by Keith Haring and two labyrinths, but this one, the country's third-largest Episcopal cathedral...

    Not many churches can boast an altarpiece by Keith Haring and two labyrinths, but this one, the country's third-largest Episcopal cathedral, does. The soaring Gothic-style structure took 14 (often interrupted) years to build, beginning in 1927 and eventually wrapping up in 1964. The gilded bronze doors at the east entrance were taken from casts of Lorenzo Ghiberti's incredible Gates of Paradise, designed for the Baptistery in Florence, Italy. A sculpture of St. Francis by Beniamino Bufano greets you as you enter.The 34-foot-wide limestone labyrinth is a replica of the 13th-century stone maze on the floor of Chartres Cathedral. All are encouraged to walk the 1/8-mile-long labyrinth, a ritual based on the tradition of meditative walking. There's also a granite outdoor labyrinth on the church's northeast side. The AIDS Interfaith Chapel, to the right as you enter Grace, contains a bronze triptych by the late artist Keith Haring and panels from the AIDS Memorial Quilt. Especially dramatic times to view the cathedral are during Tuesday-evening yoga (6 pm), Thursday-night evensong (5:15 pm), and special holiday programs.

    1100 California St., at Taylor St., San Francisco, California, 94108, USA
    415-749–6300

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free; tours $25
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  • 17. Hyde Street Pier

    Fisherman's Wharf | Museum/Gallery

    If you want to get to the heart of the Wharf, there's no better place to do it than at this pier. Don't pass up the centerpiece collection of...

    If you want to get to the heart of the Wharf, there's no better place to do it than at this pier. Don't pass up the centerpiece collection of historic vessels, part of the San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park, almost all of which can be boarded. The Balclutha, an 1886 full-rigged three-masted sailing vessel that's more than 250 feet long, sailed around Cape Horn 17 times. Kids especially love the Eureka, a side-wheel passenger and car ferry, for her onboard collection of vintage cars. The Hercules is a steam-powered tugboat, and the C. A. Thayer is a beautifully restored three-masted schooner. Across the street from the pier and a museum in itself is the maritime park's Visitor Center (499 Jefferson St., 415/447–5000), whose fun, large-scale exhibits make it an engaging stop. See a huge First Order Fresnel lighthouse lens and a shipwrecked boat. Then stroll through time in the exhibit "The Waterfront," where you can touch the timber from a gold rush–era ship recovered from below the Financial District, peek into 19th-century storefronts, and see the sails of an Italian fishing vessel.

    Hyde and Jefferson Sts., San Francisco, California, 94109, USA
    415-561–7100

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Ships $15 (ticket good for 7 days)
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  • 18. Ina Coolbrith Park

    Russian Hill | City Park

    If you make it all the way up here, you may have the place all to yourself, or at least feel like you do. The park's terraces are carved from...

    If you make it all the way up here, you may have the place all to yourself, or at least feel like you do. The park's terraces are carved from a hill so steep that it's difficult to see if anyone else is there or not. Locals love this park because it feels like a secret no one else knows about—one of the city's magic hidden gardens, with a meditative setting and spectacular views of the bay peeking out from among the trees. A poet, Oakland librarian, and niece of Mormon prophet Joseph Smith, Ina Coolbrith (1842–1928) introduced Jack London and Isadora Duncan to the world of books. For years she entertained literary greats in her Macondray Lane home near the park. In 1915 she was named poet laureate of California.

    Vallejo St. between Mason and Taylor Sts., San Francisco, California, 94133, USA
  • 19. Kabuki Springs & Spa

    Japantown | Spa–Sight

    The serene spa is one Japantown destination that draws locals from all over town, from hipsters to grandmas, Japanese American or not. Balinese...

    The serene spa is one Japantown destination that draws locals from all over town, from hipsters to grandmas, Japanese American or not. Balinese urns decorate the communal bath area of this house of tranquility. The extensive service menu includes facials, salt scrubs, and mud and seaweed wraps, in addition to massage. You can take your massage in a private room with a bath or in a curtained-off area. The communal baths ($30) contain hot and cold tubs, a large Japanese-style bath, a sauna, a steam room, and showers. Bang the gong for quiet if your fellow bathers are speaking too loudly. The clothing-optional baths are open for men only on Monday, Thursday, and Saturday; women bathe on Wednesday, Friday, and Sunday. Bathing suits are required on Tuesday, when the baths are coed. Men and women can reserve a private room daily.

    1750 Geary Blvd., San Francisco, California, 94115, USA
    415-922–6000
  • 20. Legion of Honor

    Richmond | Museum/Gallery

    Built to commemorate soldiers from California who died in World War I and set atop cliffs overlooking the ocean, the Golden Gate Bridge, and...

    Built to commemorate soldiers from California who died in World War I and set atop cliffs overlooking the ocean, the Golden Gate Bridge, and the Marin Headlands, this beautiful Beaux Arts building in Lincoln Park displays an impressive collection of 4,000 years of ancient and European art. A pyramidal glass skylight in the entrance court illuminates the lower-level galleries, which exhibit prints and drawings, European porcelain, and ancient Assyrian, Greek, Roman, and Egyptian art. The 20-plus galleries on the upper level display European art (paintings, sculpture, decorative arts, and tapestries) from the 14th century to the present day. The noteworthy Auguste Rodin collection includes two galleries devoted to the master and a third with works by Rodin and other 19th-century sculptors. An original cast of Rodin's The Thinker welcomes you as you walk through the courtyard. Also impressive is the 4,526-pipe Spreckels Organ; live concerts take advantage of the natural sound chamber produced by the building's massive rotunda. As fine as the museum is, the setting and view outshine the collection and also make a trip here worthwhile.

    100 34th Ave., at Clement St., San Francisco, California, 94121, USA
    415-750–3600

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $15, free 1st Tues. of month; free Sat. for Bay Area residents, Closed Mon.

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