Istanbul

We’ve compiled the best of the best in Istanbul - browse our top choices for the top things to see or do during your stay.

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  • 1. Aya Sofya

    Sultanahmet

    This soaring edifice is perhaps the greatest work of Byzantine architecture, and for almost a thousand years, starting from its completion in 537, it was...

    This soaring edifice is perhaps the greatest work of Byzantine architecture, and for almost a thousand years, starting from its completion in 537, it was the world's largest and most important religious monument. As Emperor Justinian may well have intended, the impression that will stay with you longest, years after a visit, is the sight of the dome. As you enter, the half domes trick you before the great space opens up with the immense dome, almost 18 stories high and more than 100 feet across, towering above. Look up into it, and you'll see the spectacle of thousands of gold tiles glittering in the light of 40 windows. Only Saint Peter's in Rome, not completed until the 17th century, surpasses Hagia Sophia in size and grandeur. It was the cathedral of Constantinople, the heart of the city's spiritual life, and the scene of imperial coronations. When Mehmet II conquered the city in 1453, he famously sprinkled dirt on his head before entering the church after the conquest as a sign of humility. His first order was for Hagia Sophia to be turned into a mosque, and, in keeping with the Islamic proscription against figural images, mosaics were plastered over. Successive sultans added the four minarets, mihrab (prayer niche), and minbar (pulpit for the imam) that visitors see today, as well as the large black medallions inscribed in Arabic with the names of Allah, Muhammad, and the early caliphs. In 1935, Atatürk turned Hagia Sophia into a museum and a project of restoration, including the uncovering of mosaics, began. In 2020, Hagia Sophia reverted into an active mosque. Recent restoration efforts uncovered, among other things, four large, beautifully preserved mosaics of seraphim, or six-winged angels, in the pendentive of the dome, which had been plastered over 160 years earlier but these and the mosaics in the upstairs galleries are currently closed. At the far end of the south gallery are several imperial portraits, including, on the left, the Empress Zoe, whose husband's face and name were clearly changed as she went through three of them. On the right is Emperor John Comnenus II with his Hungarian wife Irene and their son, Alexius, on the perpendicular wall. Also in the upper level is the great 13th-century Deesis mosaic of Christ flanked by the Virgin and John the Baptist, breathing the life of the early Renaissance that Byzantine artists would carry west to Italy after the fall of the city to the Turks—note how the shadows match the true light source to the left. The central gallery was used by female worshippers. The north gallery is famous for its graffiti, ranging from Nordic runes to a complete Byzantine galley under sail. On your way out of the church, through the "vestibule of the warriors," a mirror reminds you to look back at the mosaic of Justinian and Constantine presenting Hagia Sophia and Constantinople, respectively, to the Virgin Mary. The tombs of various sultans and princes can be visited for free through a separate entrance around the back of Aya Sofya (daily 9–6).

    Aya Sofya Sq., Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
    212-522–1750

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free
  • 2. Blue Mosque

    Sultanahmet

    Only after you enter the Blue Mosque do you understand its name. The inside is covered with 20,000 shimmering blue-green İznik tiles interspersed with 260...

    Only after you enter the Blue Mosque do you understand its name. The inside is covered with 20,000 shimmering blue-green İznik tiles interspersed with 260 stained-glass windows; calligraphy and intricate floral patterns are painted on the ceiling. After the dark corners and stern faces of the Byzantine mosaics in Aya Sofya, this mosque feels gloriously airy and full of light. Indeed, this favorable comparison was the intention of architect Mehmet Ağa (a former student of the famous Ottoman architect Sinan), whose goal was to surpass Justinian's crowning achievement (Aya Sofya). At the behest of Sultan Ahmet I (ruled 1603–17), he created this masterpiece of Ottoman craftsmanship, starting in 1609 and completing it in just eight years, and many believe he indeed succeeded in outdoing the splendor of Aya Sofya. Mehmet Ağa actually went a little too far, though, when he surrounded the massive structure with six minarets: this number linked the Blue Mosque with the Masjid al-Haram in Mecca—and this could not be allowed. So Sultan Ahmet I was forced to send Mehmet Ağa down to the Holy City to build a seventh minaret for al-Haram and reestablish the eminence of that mosque. Sultan Ahmet and some of his family are interred in the türbe (mausoleum) at a corner of the complex. From outside of the Blue Mosque you can see the genius of Mehmet Ağa, who didn't attempt to surpass the massive dome of Aya Sofya across the way, but instead built a secession of domes of varying sizes to cover the huge interior space, creating an effect that is both whimsical and uplifting. Note that, as of this writing, the Blue Mosque is undergoing an extensive restoration. Although it remains open to the public (except during services), some of the interior details might be blocked by scaffolding.

    Sultanahmet Sq., Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey

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    Rate Includes: Free
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  • 3. Dolmabahçe Sarayı

    Besiktas

    Abdülmecid I, whose free-spending lifestyle later bankrupted the empire, had this palace built between 1843 and 1856 as a symbol of Turkey's march toward European-style...

    Abdülmecid I, whose free-spending lifestyle later bankrupted the empire, had this palace built between 1843 and 1856 as a symbol of Turkey's march toward European-style modernization. It's also where Atatürk died (and all clocks in the palace are turned to his time of death). Its name means "filled-in garden," inspired by the imperial garden planted here by Sultan Ahmet I (ruled 1603–17). Abdülmecid gave father and son Garabet and Nikoğos Balyan complete freedom and an unlimited budget, the only demand being that the palace "surpass any other palace of any other potentate anywhere in the world." The result, an extraordinary mixture of Turkish and European architectural and decorative styles, is as over-the-top and showy as a palace should be—and every bit as garish as Versailles. Dolmabahçe is divided into the public Selamlık and the private Harem, which can only be seen on a separate guided tour. The two tours together take about 90 minutes. Afterward, stroll along the palace's nearly ½-km (¼-mile)-long waterfront facade and through the formal gardens, which have the Crystal Pavilion and Clock Museum. The palace has a daily visitor quota, so call the reservation number at least a day in advance to reserve tickets.

    Dolmabahçe Cad., Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
    212-327–2626-for reservations only

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Selamlık TL120, Harem TL90, combined ticket TL150, Closed Mon.
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  • 4. İstanbul Arkeoloji Müzeleri

    Sultanahmet

    Step into this vast repository of spectacular finds, housed in a three-building complex in a forecourt of Topkapı Palace, to get a head-spinning look at...

    Step into this vast repository of spectacular finds, housed in a three-building complex in a forecourt of Topkapı Palace, to get a head-spinning look at the civilizations that have thrived for thousands of years in and around Turkey. The main museum was established in 1891, when forward-thinking archaeologist and painter Osman Hamdi Bey campaigned to keep native antiquities and some items from the former countries of the Ottoman Empire in Turkish hands. The most stunning pieces are sarcophagi that include the so-called Alexander Sarcophagus, found in Lebanon, carved with scenes from Alexander the Great's battles, and once believed, wrongly, to be his final resting place. A fascinating exhibit on Istanbul through the ages has artifacts and fragments brought from historical sites around the city that shed light on its complex past, from prehistory through the Byzantine period. Exhibits on Anatolia include a display of some of the artifacts found in excavations at Troy, including a smattering of gold jewelry. Don't miss a visit to the Çinili Köşk (Tiled Pavilion), one of the most visually pleasing sights in all of Istanbul—a bright profusion of colored tiles covers this onetime hunting lodge of Mehmet the Conqueror, built in 1472. Inside are ceramics from the early Seljuk and Ottoman empires, as well as brilliant tiles from İznik, the city that produced perhaps the finest ceramics in the world during the 16th and 17th centuries. In summer, you can mull over these glimpses into the distant past as you sip coffee or tea at the café in the garden, surrounded by fragments of ancient sculptures. The Eski Şark Eserleri Müzesi (Museum of the Ancient Orient) transports you to even earlier times: a majority of the panels, mosaics, obelisks, and other artifacts here, from Anatolia, Mesopotamia, and elsewhere in the Arab world, date from the pre-Christian centuries. One of the most significant pieces in the collection is a 13th-century BC tablet on which is recorded the Treaty of Kadesh, perhaps the world's earliest known peace treaty, an accord between the Hittite king Hattusili III and the Egyptian pharaoh Ramses II. Also noteworthy are reliefs from the ancient city of Babylon, dating from the era of the famous king Nebuchadnezzar II.

    Osman Hamdi Bey Yokuşu, Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
    212-520–7740

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: TL65
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  • 5. İstanbul Modern

    Beyoglu

    Currently housed in a temporary space while its usual home on the shore of the Bosphorus is rebuilt, the İstanbul Modern of Modern Art showcases...

    Currently housed in a temporary space while its usual home on the shore of the Bosphorus is rebuilt, the İstanbul Modern of Modern Art showcases modern and contemporary painting, sculpture, photography, and works in other media from Turkey and around the world. A top-notch program of temporary exhibitions features significant local and international contemporary artists. A private tour can be organized in English for groups of four or more (20 TL per person) and will give you a good introduction to the art scene in Turkey. The museum also has a small cinema, café, and design store.

    Meşrutiyet Cad. 99, Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
    212-334–7300

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: TL72; audio guide TL15, Closed Mon.
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  • 6. Kapalı Çarşı

    The Bazaar Quarter and Environs

    Take a deep breath, and plunge into this maze of 65 winding, covered streets crammed with 4,000 tiny shops, cafés, restaurants, mosques, and courtyards. Originally...

    Take a deep breath, and plunge into this maze of 65 winding, covered streets crammed with 4,000 tiny shops, cafés, restaurants, mosques, and courtyards. Originally built by Mehmet II (the Conqueror) in 1461 over the main Byzantine shopping streets, the Grand Bazaar was rebuilt after fires in both 1943 and 1954. It's said that this early version of a shopping mall contains the largest concentration of stores under one roof anywhere in the world, and that's easy to believe. Some of the most aggressive salesmanship in the world takes place here, so take yet another deep breath, and put up your guard while exploring. Oddly enough, though, the sales pitches, the crowds, and the sheer volume of junky trinkets on offer can be hypnotizing. Enjoy a glass of tea while you browse through leather goods, carpets, fabric, clothing, furniture, ceramics, and gold and silver jewelry. Remember, whether you're bargaining for a pair of shoes or an antique carpet, the best prices are offered when the would-be seller thinks you are about to slip away.

    Yeniçeriler Cad. and Çadırcılar Cad., Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
    212-519–1248

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Closed Sun.
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  • 7. Süleymaniye Camii

    The Bazaar Quarter and Environs

    On a hilltop opposite Istanbul University is one of the city's most magnificent mosques, considered one of the architect Sinan's masterpieces. The architectural thrill of...

    On a hilltop opposite Istanbul University is one of the city's most magnificent mosques, considered one of the architect Sinan's masterpieces. The architectural thrill of the mosque, which was built between 1550 and 1557 and fully restored in 2010, is the enormous dome, the highest of any Ottoman mosque. Supported by four square columns and arches, as well as exterior walls with smaller domes on either side, the soaring space gives the impression that it's held up principally by divine intervention. Except for around the mihrab (prayer niche), there is little in the way of tile work—though the intricate stained-glass windows and baroque decorations painted on the domes more than make up for that. The tomb of Sinan is just outside the walls, on the northern corner, while those of his patron, Süleyman the Magnificent, and the sultan's wife, Roxelana, are in the adjacent cemetery. Stroll around the beautiful grounds, and don't miss the wonderful views of the Golden Horn.

    Süleymaniye Cad., Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
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  • 8. Topkapı Sarayı

    Sultanahmet

    This vast palace on Sarayburnu (Seraglio Point) was the residence of sultans and their harems in addition to being the seat of Ottoman rule from...

    This vast palace on Sarayburnu (Seraglio Point) was the residence of sultans and their harems in addition to being the seat of Ottoman rule from the 1460s until the mid-19th century, when Sultan Abdülmecid I moved his court to Dolmabahçe Palace. Sultan Mehmet II built the original Topkapı Palace between 1459 and 1465, shortly after his conquest of Constantinople. Over the centuries, it grew to include four courtyards and quarters for some 5,000 full-time residents. The main entrance, or Imperial Gate, leads to the Court of the Janissaries, also known as the First Courtyard. The modestly beautiful Aya Irini (Church of St. Irene) is believed to stand on the site of the first church of Byzantium (separate admission). You will begin to experience the grandeur of the palace when you pass through the Bab-üs Selam (Gate of Salutation). Enter the Harem (separate admission) on the other side of the Divan from the Outer Treasury. The Treasury contains the popular jewels, including the 86-carat Spoonmaker's Diamond, the emerald-studded Topkapı Dagger, and two uncut emeralds (each weighing about 8 pounds!). Save time by using a Museum Pass or booking a timed ticket online in advance.

    Babıhümayun Cad., Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
    212-512–0480

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Palace TL200, Harem TL100, Aya Irini TL80, Closed Tues.
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  • 9. Türk ve İslam Eserleri Müzesi

    Sultanahmet

    Süleyman the Magnificent commissioned Sinan to build this grandiose stone palace overlooking the Hippodrome in about 1520 for his brother-in-law, the grand vizier Ibrahim Pasha,...

    Süleyman the Magnificent commissioned Sinan to build this grandiose stone palace overlooking the Hippodrome in about 1520 for his brother-in-law, the grand vizier Ibrahim Pasha, and it is one of the most important surviving examples of secular Ottoman architecture from its time. It now houses the Museum of Turkish and Islamic Arts, which has an exceptional collection of Islamic art and artifacts dating from the 7th through 20th century, including lavishly illustrated Korans and other calligraphic manuscripts; intricate metalwork; wood and stone carvings; an astrolabe from the 1200s; colorful ceramics; religious relics and artifacts, including an elaborate hajj certificate and device for determining the direction of Mecca; and one of the world's most highly regarded troves of antique carpets.

    Atmeydanı 46, Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
    212-518–1805

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: TL60
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  • 10. Yerebatan Sarnıcı

    Sultanahmet

    The major problem with the site of Byzantium was the lack of fresh water. So, for the city to grow, a great system of aqueducts...

    The major problem with the site of Byzantium was the lack of fresh water. So, for the city to grow, a great system of aqueducts and cisterns was built, the most famous of which is the Basilica Cistern, whose present form dates from the reign of Justinian in the 6th century. A journey through this ancient underground waterway takes you along dimly lit walkways that weave around 336 marble columns rising 26 feet to support Byzantine arches and domes, from which water drips unceasingly. The two most famous columns feature upturned Medusa heads. The cistern was always kept full as a precaution against long sieges, and fish, presumably descendants of those that arrived in Byzantine times, still flit through the dark waters. A hauntingly beautiful oasis of cool, shadowed, cathedral-like stillness (with Turkish instrumental music playing softly in the background), the cistern is a particularly relaxing place to get away from the hubbub of the Old City. Come early to avoid the long lines and have a more peaceful visit. This site is closed for renovations as of spring 2022. Check the website for updates.

    Yerebatan Cad. at Divan Yolu, Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
    212-512–1570

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    Rate Includes: TL20
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  • 11. Ahrida Synagogue

    Western Districts

    Located in Balat, the city's historically Jewish district, Istanbul's oldest synagogue is believed to date from the 1430s, when it was founded by Jews from...

    Located in Balat, the city's historically Jewish district, Istanbul's oldest synagogue is believed to date from the 1430s, when it was founded by Jews from the town of Ohrid in what is today Macedonia. The synagogue was extensively restored in 1992 to the Ottoman baroque style of its last major reconstruction in the 17th century. The most interesting feature of this Sephardic place of worship is the boat-shape wooden bimah (reading platform), whose form is thought to represent either Noah's Ark or the ships that brought the Jews from the Iberian Peninsula to the Ottoman Empire in 1492. To visit, you must apply by email (preferred) or fax at least four business days in advance to the Chief Rabbinate (follow the directions on the website).

    Kürkçü Çeşmesi Sok. 7, Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
    212-293–8794
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  • 12. Anadolu Kavağı

    Bosphorus

    At the upper end of the Asian shore, Anadolu Kavağı is the final destination on the full Bosphorus cruises. A pretty little fishing village, it...

    At the upper end of the Asian shore, Anadolu Kavağı is the final destination on the full Bosphorus cruises. A pretty little fishing village, it gets enough tourists to have a large number of seafood restaurants, waffle stands, and ice cream shops. The main attraction is the dramatically situated Byzantine Castle (aka Yoros Castle), a 15-minute walk uphill from the village. The hill was once the site of a temple to Zeus Ourios (god of the favoring winds), which dates back, legend has it, to the days when Jason passed by in search of the Golden Fleece. The castle, built by the Byzantines and expanded by their Genoese allies, is today in a fairly ruined state, but the climb up is still worth it for the spectacular views over the upper Bosphorus from the cafés and restaurants just below its walls.

    Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
  • 13. Arnavutköy

    Bosphorus

    This picturesque European-side neighborhood just below Bebek is a pleasant place for a stroll. The waterfront is taken up by a row of beautiful 19th-century...

    This picturesque European-side neighborhood just below Bebek is a pleasant place for a stroll. The waterfront is taken up by a row of beautiful 19th-century wooden yalıs, some of which now house fish restaurants. Up the hill from the water, narrow streets are lined with more old wooden houses, some with trailing vines.

    Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
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  • 14. Askeri Müze

    Nisantasi

    This large and fascinating museum boasts an extensive collection of swords, daggers, armor, and other weaponry, but it's not just for those interested in military...

    This large and fascinating museum boasts an extensive collection of swords, daggers, armor, and other weaponry, but it's not just for those interested in military history. Exhibits on the history of Turkic armies going back to the Huns, the Ottoman conquest of Istanbul, and more recent Turkish military engagements show the importance of military strength in shaping Ottoman history and modern Turkish society. Two gorgeously embroidered silk tents used by the Ottoman sultans on campaigns are particularly impressive. And don't miss the section of the great chain that the Byzantines stretched across the Golden Horn in 1453 during the Ottoman siege of the city. The highlight is the Mehter, or Janissary military band, which performs 17th- and 18th-century Ottoman military music in full period costume in a special auditorium at 3 pm when they're in town (most days when the museum is open). Watching this 55-member-strong ensemble, with their thunderous kettledrums and cymbals, will certainly give you an idea of why the Ottoman army was so feared in its day.

    Valikonağı Cad., Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
    212-233–2720

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: TL13, Closed Mon.
  • 15. Balık Pazarı

    Beyoglu

    Just off İstiklal Caddesi, next to the entrance to the Çiçek Pasajı, the Balık Pazarı makes for great street theater: it's a bustling labyrinth of...

    Just off İstiklal Caddesi, next to the entrance to the Çiçek Pasajı, the Balık Pazarı makes for great street theater: it's a bustling labyrinth of streets filled with stands selling fish, produce, spices, sweets, and souvenirs, and there are also a couple of eateries specializing in kokoreç (grilled lamb intestines). The adjacent Second Empire–style arcade, known as Çiçek Pasajı, was one of Istanbul's grandest shopping venues when it was built in 1876. In the early 20th century, it was gradually taken over by flower shops run by White Russian émigrés—earning it the name "Flower Arcade." In later decades, the arcade became dominated by famously boisterous meyhanes, or tavernas. It now houses about a dozen rather touristy meyhane-style restaurants offering meze and fish. For a more authentic local vibe, continue toward the end of the Fish Market and turn right on narrow Nevizade Sokak, a lively strip of bars and meyhanes, all with tiny sidewalk tables packed with locals in summer.

    Sahne Sok., Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
  • 16. Bebek

    Bosphorus

    One of Istanbul's most fashionable suburbs is 20 to 30 minutes by taxi from central Istanbul and is especially popular with the affluent boating set,...

    One of Istanbul's most fashionable suburbs is 20 to 30 minutes by taxi from central Istanbul and is especially popular with the affluent boating set, thanks to the area's pretty, natural harbor. The European-side neighborhood has a number of cafés and restaurants, as well as a few upscale boutiques selling clothing and jewelry, on both sides of the main coastal road. There's also a small, shaded public park on the waterfront. The stretches of coastline both north and south of Bebek are perfect for a promenade.

    Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
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  • 17. Beyazıt Camii

    The Bazaar Quarter and Environs

    Inspired by Aya Sofya and completed in 1506, this domed mosque holds the distinction of being the oldest of the Ottoman imperial mosques still standing...

    Inspired by Aya Sofya and completed in 1506, this domed mosque holds the distinction of being the oldest of the Ottoman imperial mosques still standing in the city. Though the inside is somewhat dark, it has an impressively carved mihrab and the large courtyard has 20 columns made of verd antique, red granite, and porphyry that were taken from ancient buildings.

    Beyazıt Meyd., Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
  • 18. Beylerbeyi Palace

    Bosphorus

    Built as a summer residence for Sultan Abdülaziz in 1865, this palace is like Dolmabahçe in that incorporates a mix of European and Turkish styles,...

    Built as a summer residence for Sultan Abdülaziz in 1865, this palace is like Dolmabahçe in that incorporates a mix of European and Turkish styles, but it is smaller, less grandiose, and has a more personal feel. You must join a tour to see Beylerbeyi, which has ornately painted ceilings, Baccarat crystal chandeliers, gold-topped marble columns, and intricately carved wooden furniture. In addition, its central hall has a white-marble fountain and a stairway wide enough for a regiment. The magnolia-shaded grounds on the Asian side of the Bosphorus, underneath the first bridge, are also pleasant. Two waterfront bathing pavilions (one was for men, the other for women) stand out for their fanciful architecture.

    Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
    216-321–9320

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: TL60, Closed Mon.
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  • 19. Büyük Saray Mozaikleri Müzesi

    Sultanahmet

    A tantalizing glimpse into Istanbul's pre-Ottoman past, the small but well-done Mosaic Museum can be reached via an entrance halfway through the Arasta Bazaar. The...

    A tantalizing glimpse into Istanbul's pre-Ottoman past, the small but well-done Mosaic Museum can be reached via an entrance halfway through the Arasta Bazaar. The museum houses a fascinating display of early Byzantine mosaics—some presented in situ—from the Great Palace of Byzantium, the imperial residence of the early Byzantine emperors when they ruled lands stretching from Iran to Italy and from the Caucasus to North Africa. Only scant ruins remained by 1935, when archaeologists began uncovering what is thought to have been the floor of a palace courtyard, covered with some of the most elaborate and delightful mosaics to survive from the era, most dating from the 6th century. They include images of animals, flowers, hunting scenes, and mythological characters—idylls far removed from the pomp and elaborate ritual of the imperial court. As you walk the streets of Sultanahmet, you'll see many fragments of masonry and brickwork that were once part of the palace, and several cisterns, some of which are open to visitors, have been found under hotels and carpet shops.

    Torun Sok., Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
    212-518–1205

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: TL35
  • 20. Çemberlitaş

    The Bazaar Quarter and Environs

    This column stood at the center of what was a large circular marketplace or forum where Constantine formally rededicated the city on May 11, 330...

    This column stood at the center of what was a large circular marketplace or forum where Constantine formally rededicated the city on May 11, 330 AD. Carved out of blocks of a reddish-purple stone called porphyry that was especially prized by the ancient Romans, the column is 115 feet high and was once topped by a golden statue of Apollo, to which Constantine added his own head. Constantine was said to have placed various relics under the column, including an ax used by Noah to make the ark, a piece of the True Cross, and some of the leftover bread from the miracle of the loaves and fishes.

    Yeniçeriler Cad. and Vezirhan Cad., Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
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