Fodor's Expert Review Japanese Covered Bridge

Hoi An Religious Building/Site/Shrine Fodor's Choice

On the west end of Tran Phu, Hoi An's most celebrated icon was built in 1593 by Japanese merchants to connect the Japanese quarter with the Chinese neighborhood on the other side of the river. This unique city symbol has been rebuilt several times since, but still retains the original ornate roofing, arched frame, and small temple housed inside. Legends surround the functions of the bridge, the most popular being that it was built to disable a disaster-causing dragon, with the small altar inside dedicated to the worship of Bac De Tran Vu, a northern god in charge of wind and rain. The pair of spirit dogs on the east side of the bridge are thought to be protective deities, placed on altar stones to exorcise bad omens. If you look closely you'll notice they are different sizes: a boy and a girl. Some say the monkeys here represent Japanese emperors. What is not widely known is that the monkeys are copies carved by the carpenters of Kim Bong Village; the original pair were swept away during... READ MORE

On the west end of Tran Phu, Hoi An's most celebrated icon was built in 1593 by Japanese merchants to connect the Japanese quarter with the Chinese neighborhood on the other side of the river. This unique city symbol has been rebuilt several times since, but still retains the original ornate roofing, arched frame, and small temple housed inside. Legends surround the functions of the bridge, the most popular being that it was built to disable a disaster-causing dragon, with the small altar inside dedicated to the worship of Bac De Tran Vu, a northern god in charge of wind and rain. The pair of spirit dogs on the east side of the bridge are thought to be protective deities, placed on altar stones to exorcise bad omens. If you look closely you'll notice they are different sizes: a boy and a girl. Some say the monkeys here represent Japanese emperors. What is not widely known is that the monkeys are copies carved by the carpenters of Kim Bong Village; the original pair were swept away during a flood and washed up beyond repair 20 years later.

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Religious Building/Site/Shrine Bridge/Tunnel Notable Building Historic District/Site Fodor's Choice

Quick Facts

West end of Tran Phu St.
Hoi An, Quang Nam  Vietnam

Sight Details:
One of five sites on the 120,000d Hoi An Ancient Town Entrance Ticket Rate Includes: Included in the 120,000d tourist-office ticket

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