Fodor's Expert Review Temple of Ramses II

Abydos Ruins

Some 300 yards northwest of the Seti I temple lies the Temple of Ramses II (1290–1224 BC). Its roof and most of the upper portions of its walls are missing, but enough of it remains to give you a feeling for its layout and decoration. What is left of the decoration shows that this temple—unlike the inferior work that Ramses commissioned to complete Seti I's temple—is close in style and quality to what was done during the reign of Seti I. And the vibrant reds, yellows, and bright green here are a joy to behold.

The first pylon and court are no longer in existence; instead, the entrance is through the semipreserved second pylon, which leads to a court surrounded by pillars decorated with the figure of Ramses in an Osirid pose (as a mummy with arms crossed in front of his breast). The walls are carved and painted with scenes of Ramses making offerings to various deities, animals being taken for sacrifice, and prisoners of war.

From the court, walk up to the portico leading... READ MORE

Some 300 yards northwest of the Seti I temple lies the Temple of Ramses II (1290–1224 BC). Its roof and most of the upper portions of its walls are missing, but enough of it remains to give you a feeling for its layout and decoration. What is left of the decoration shows that this temple—unlike the inferior work that Ramses commissioned to complete Seti I's temple—is close in style and quality to what was done during the reign of Seti I. And the vibrant reds, yellows, and bright green here are a joy to behold.

The first pylon and court are no longer in existence; instead, the entrance is through the semipreserved second pylon, which leads to a court surrounded by pillars decorated with the figure of Ramses in an Osirid pose (as a mummy with arms crossed in front of his breast). The walls are carved and painted with scenes of Ramses making offerings to various deities, animals being taken for sacrifice, and prisoners of war.

From the court, walk up to the portico leading to two hypostyle halls with chapels off of them. Scenes of captives, religious processions, and offerings made by the king to the various gods adorn the walls.

READ LESS
Ruins

Quick Facts

Mabed Seti, Aswan  Egypt

Sight Details:
Rate Includes: £E35 (includes Temple of Seti I)

Related Forum Posts

Around the Web