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How do you manage a long-trip to Latin America

How do you manage a long-trip to Latin America

Old Jan 29th, 2017, 10:25 AM
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How do you manage a long-trip to Latin America

Hi,
I wish to travel throughout Latin America (I'll begin in South, and continue to Central) for 1 year.
I don't have a skeleton yet, but perhaps Peru -> Bolivia -> Argentina & Chile , and then fly to Central America.
Some countries require an onward ticket in order to get inside them.
How do you handle that?
I'd appreciate it if you could go a bit into details.
Thanks!
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Old Jan 29th, 2017, 11:34 AM
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There have been times in my travel life where my plan was to proceed from one country to another by surface means. And with dates sometimes uncertain, it can be impractical to book any transport far in advance. I always have a detailed itinerary composed and printed, even if changes occur along the way and they always do. But I figure if it's in black & white, with dates, transport and hotels noted, it will do. But in all the years I've been on long trips all over the world, I haven't been asked, even once, to produce proof of onward travel.
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Old Jan 29th, 2017, 11:38 AM
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I should say also that if visas are required it could be another matter. But a year in advance is too long, in my experience, to get a visa (it varies from country to country) and I get visas I need as I go, a country or 2 in advance, depending on time frame. So in the case of a an onward ticket needed for a visa application, buy it just prior to applying and when you have a better idea of plans.
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Old Jan 29th, 2017, 12:03 PM
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Hi,
Thank you for your comments.
I mis-explained myself.
I'll begin the journey this May.

I checked it and found that when I reach Argentina, I might be asked to provide an onward travel ticket / return ticket, in order to get permission to travel in the country.

The thing is that I don't know how much time I wish to spend in Argentina.

How can I then provide an onward ticket for the Argentinian authorities when I enter Argentina?

Thank you.
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Old Jan 29th, 2017, 12:28 PM
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I understood what you were asking. Approximately how long after you leave home do you plan to be in Argentina? How do you plan to leave Argentine? By air? By bus?

Also, will you have a return ticket for the end of your trip to wherever you're from?
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Old Jan 29th, 2017, 01:44 PM
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I have done two six month trips to South America covering all the countries you mention plus Colombia and Uruguay and Ecuador and have never once been asked to provide evidence of onward travel. I travel on a British passport if that makes any difference ( and who knows, your passport may make a difference in the post Trump world!)

The only country I know of where there have been specific warnings re proof of onward travel is Peru and I have crossed borders there by air and land maybe six or seven times.

If you have an open jaw ticket for your flights for ten year that may help if asked. Others I know have gone tomthe trouble of buying refundable air tickets and or bus tickets. In the case of Argentina, you could always by the cheapest ticket you can find out of the country Uruguay (or a ferry ticket to Montevideo . You don't have to actually use it.

As with many immigration people, you need to look as if you can afford to live in the country for the time you are there or demonstrate you have the cash to support yourself. In reality, I have never found that anyone cares much.

If you are concerned specifically about Argentina then if you are buying an open jaw ticket to bookend your trip ( almost certainly the cheapest option, even if the return flight is mor Ethan a year out most airlines will allow you to buy the closet to your actual departure date and then provide a free change.

BTW wouldn't it make more sense to start from Chile or Argentina and work your way up through Bolivia and Peru. I would aslso give serious consideration to Colombia. An amazing country!

Two of our blog ps cover our trips to South America takeing different routes. You may fine some of our experiences helpful

https://accidentalnomads.com this was for our trip from May to Sept this year. Just click on the destination drop down from the various countries.

Our trip in 2013 taking a different route is on a different trip @ http://www.travelpod.com/travel-blog...ai/6/tpod.html

Be aware that if you hold a US passport some countries charge a reciprocity fee of around $160 which can add up.
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Old Jan 29th, 2017, 05:24 PM
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It is usually not the local authorities who demand proof of onward travel but the first airline you check in at on your departure from your home country. They say that they would be responsible for flying you back if you should fail to satisfy the authorities at your destination that you qualify for entry. This is true but seldom happens. Cynics say they use it as an excuse to sell you an expensive ticket at the counter before they will let you board.

A return ticket, even returning from another country (open jaw), should be sufficient. One way tickets are more likely to cause problems. Not all countries require proof of onward travel; Chile does not.

You can buy bus tickets on Argentine buses going between Chile and Argentina in either direction about three months in advance and print out your receipt. Onward travel is onward travel, it doesn't have to be on a plane. But do have some sort of return ticket from somewhere and not a one way for your main flight.
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Old Jan 30th, 2017, 06:08 AM
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There are a lot more people who do this type of long, multi-country trip who post on Lonely Planet's Thorn Tree forum. You might try asking your questions there.
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Old Feb 1st, 2017, 12:50 AM
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